Helping Kids Through Embarrassing Moments

The only way they’ll truly learn from your example is if you’re able to allow them into your world at their age.

Kids experience a lot. As adults, I don’t think we honestly understand this. It’s hard being a kid. You’re experiencing everything for the first time. Literally. You have no background on a lot of new experiences.

You see, as adults, we’ve been burned, scorned and played many times. We’ve got experience. This helps us to make smarter decisions when certain opportunities present themselves. Often times we discipline our kids based on the experiences that we’ve had. Nothing wrong with that but there’s a huge gap that needs to be filled and the gap is their experience.

Their experience is important. It’s what’s going to ultimately help them make their own decisions when they see situations arise.

The one thing that most parents do is to not allow their kids to experience pain or hurt. They want them to be buffered from everything. I get it. So do I . Who wants to see their kid purposely suffer? No one but if you don’t understand the basic commonality that goes into growth, then you will be hindering them from their potential.

The basic commonality being experience.

Often times, experience comes with embarrassment. You have to go through some embarrassing moments to get experience. It happens. I remember my first kiss. It was embarrassing. It was with a girl named Michelle who was hot. I didn’t know how to kiss. I basically practiced on my pillow. This isn’t a lie. I would pretend the pillow was my girl to hold and then practice tongue kissing the air.

Embarrassing.

But when the actual moment came, I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. My tongue couldn’t even come out of my mouth. I had no idea how to French kiss. This was in high school mind you. I was a late bloomer.

One day, Michelle called me on the phone and took me to school on how to kiss. She basically told me to open my mouth and stick my tongue out as far as I could and then move it around in a figure eight motion. Then at the end of that tutorial she said, and that’s how you kiss me from now on.

Lesson learned.

Guess what, my son Trey will experience that when his time comes. At some moment he’ll have his kissing moment and you know what, I’ll be the first parent to tell him my completely embarrassing moment.

That’s how you put kids at ease with their experiences. There are too many parents that want to teach their kids without actually touching their kids. What do I mean by that? You have to be willing to share your embarrassing moments. You have to tell them the good, the bad and the ugly. You can’t come off as the perfect parent and perfect person.

No one learns from that. It’s not relatable.

You have to be willing to be all about diving into your past and digging up the stuff that resonates. And that stuff is your embarrassing moments. You have to get on your kids level and help them understand that you too were once a kid. Same experiences just a different time period. Who cares that it was 20 plus years ago. Not much changes when it comes to embarrassing human activities.

The key is to be real. And to be real, you must be relatable. You must share your moments and don’t talk as if you’ve never had that moment that your kid is experiencing.

Kids these days are thirsting for something real. Something that they can experience without feeling as if they’re the only ones going through it. If they don’t get this knowledge from you, they’ll end up getting it from their friends. And when they can’t get all the info from their friends, they’ll get it from Google, YouTube and Wikipedia.

In order for you to remain credible and the first truth bearer, you must be the first to tell them about your embarrassing experience with a situation that’s comparative to theirs.

#1 Mindset

Fred Blumenberg

Fred is currently putting together a program for students of all ages. This revolutionary program helps kids of all ages maximize and focus on their strengths to improve confidence and mindset in areas that need improvement. The philosophy of the #1 Mindset which is that no one’s made with weaknesses and there are no accidents. We’re all made on purpose for a purpose and our purpose lies in our strengths.

Be watchful for two programs that :

Go to https://www.therealfredlee.com/ for more information on these two programs!

Fred is a proud married father of four beautiful children. He’s worked in the school district for over a decade and has extensive knowledge on student behavior in the regular and special education sectors. Fred Blumenberg is a #1 Entrepreneur Mindset Coach who gets entrepreneurs to hyper-focus on monetizing their strengths to achieve greatness.

All articles on Medium.com will be towards helping parents who adopt the philosophy of the #1 Mindset — which is that no one’s made with weaknesses and there are no accidents.

Contact Fred Blumenberg today by chatting with him via the website:https://www.therealfredlee.com/

Kids experience a lot. As adults, I don’t think we honestly understand this. It’s hard being a kid. You’re experiencing everything for the first time. Literally. You have no background on a lot of new experiences.

You see, as adults, we’ve been burned, scorned and played many times. We’ve got experience. This helps us to make smarter decisions when certain opportunities present themselves. Often times we discipline our kids based on the experiences that we’ve had. Nothing wrong with that but there’s a huge gap that needs to be filled and the gap is their experience.

Their experience is important. It’s what’s going to ultimately help them make their own decisions when they see situations arise. The one thing that most parents do is to not allow their kids to experience pain or hurt. They want them to be buffered from everything. I get it. So do I . Who wants to see their kid purposely suffer? No one but if you don’t understand the basic commonality that goes into growth, then you will be hindering them from their potential.

The basic commonality being experience.

Often times, experience comes with embarrassment. You have to go through some embarrassing moments to get experience. It happens. I remember my first kiss. It was embarrassing. It was with a girl named Michelle who was hot. I didn’t know how to kiss. I basically practiced on my pillow. This isn’t a lie. I would pretend the pillow was my girl to hold and then practice tongue kissing the air.

Embarrassing.

But when the actual moment came, I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. My tongue couldn’t even come out of my mouth. I had no idea how to French kiss. This was in high school mind you. I was a late bloomer.

One day, Michelle called me on the phone and took me to school on how to kiss. She basically told me to open my mouth and stick my tongue out as far as I could and then move it around in a figure eight motion. Then at the end of that tutorial she said, and that’s how you kiss me from now on.

Lesson learned.

Guess what, my son Trey will experience that when his time comes. At some moment he’ll have his kissing moment and you know what, I’ll be the first parent to tell him my completely embarrassing moment.

That’s how you put kids at ease with their experiences. There are too many parents that want to teach their kids without actually touching their kids. What do I mean by that? You have to be willing to share your embarrassing moments. You have to tell them the good, the bad and the ugly. You can’t come off as the perfect parent and perfect person.

No one learns from that. It’s not relatable.

You have to be willing to be all about diving into your past and digging up the stuff that resonates. And that stuff is your embarrassing moments. You have to get on your kids level and help them understand that you too were once a kid. Same experiences just a different time period. Who cares that it was 20 plus years ago. Not much changes when it comes to embarrassing human activities.

The key is to be real. And to be real, you must be relatable. You must share your moments and don’t talk as if you’ve never had that moment that your kid is experiencing.

Kids these days are thirsting for something real. Something that they can experience without feeling as if they’re the only ones going through it. If they don’t get this knowledge from you, they’ll end up getting it from their friends. And when they can’t get all the info from their friends, they’ll get it from Google, YouTube and Wikipedia.

In order for you to remain credible and the first truth bearer, you must be the first to tell them about your embarrassing experience with a situation that’s comparative to theirs.

Don’t be afraid. You’ve got plenty of embarrassing moments. We ALL DO.

#1 Mindset

Fred Blumenberg

Married 🧔🏽👱🏼‍♀️ 4 kids🧑🏼‍🦱👧🏽👧🏼🧒🏽 Positive 💙 Medium is where I help parents stay positive! 💙 Get into my private FB group 🔐 https://bit.ly/2CavS